Combi-Ovens, Explained!

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

combi-ovenWe’ve talked about how important it is in the restaurant industry to keep up with the most current trends.  With technology is advancing a rapid rate, it can seem like an overwhelming to stay up to date.  However, in the long run, the investment can pay off.  One of the newest restaurant technologies is the commercial combi-oven.  While it may have a higher price tag than a traditional convection oven or steamer, in the long run the variety of tasks it can perform in the kitchen can save a restaurant money in the long run.

Combi-ovens are a fairly new kitchen technology that radically reduces the amount of equipment you need to get your restaurant up and running.  They offer three cooking options in one package: pressureless steam, convected heat, or a combination of both (hence the name).  While traditionally chefs had to choose between using dry cooking (from a convection oven) or moisture (from a steamer), combi-ovens allow for you to have the best of both worlds.  The controls are very precise in order to ensure that you are able to get the exact amount of steam and heat that you need.  Along with this, most combi-ovens can be set to cook at very low heat, making them a perfect option to cook and braise meat.

Many equipment dealers have started offering combi-ovens.  Restaurant Appliance Depot, for example, offers Cleveland Convotherm models, with either gas or electric power.  While they may be unfamiliar to many kitchen owners, and their higher price tags may raise some eyebrows, their versatility makes them an easy way to save space, time, and money in the kitchen.  Because of this many restaurateurs have already added a combi oven to their line.  If you have any questions about Combi-ovens or any other restaurant equipment, or you have a suggestion for a blog topic comment below.  Also, don’t forget to subscribe to see stay up to date with our latest posts.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail Pages:
Edit